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Tales have been told of the men and animals who dropped from the sides of cliffs en route and never reached their destination.

The men who went to the Klondike in 1898 didn't have a clue that trouble was brewing, that would result in war in South Africa the following year.

ETIQUETTE IN THE 1890s

Back in 1897 there was scarcely a settler's home that did not have a book of etiquette in it. Prof. B. G. Jeffries, M.D., Ph.D., was admired as an authority on the subject in those days, and thousands of his 508 paged, hard cover books could be found all across the country. One of these pooks is in a Portage la Prairie home today and has provided moments of much interesting and amusing reading. As you can well imagine, 508 pages can contain a tremendous number of "DOs and DON'Ts"! A person would have to have mighty good memory to avoid a 'faux pas' in one of the many social graces! Picking a few at random, for your interest and amusement, we quote:

"In crossing the street a lady should gracefully raise her dress a little above her ankle with one hand. To raise the dress with both hands is vulgar, except in places where the mud is very deep.

The hair should be thoroughly brushed and well kept, and the beard of men properly trimmed. Men should not let their hair grow long and shaggy. No one should appear as though he had slept in a stable. A young man's vest should always be kept buttoned in the presence of ladies.

Should you find yourself at a table where they have the old­ fashioned steel forks, eat with your knife, as the others do, and do not let it be seen that you have any objection to doing so.

Should you find a worm or insect in your food, say nothing about

it.

Tea, coffee, chocolate and the like are drunk from the cup and never from the saucer.

Never put bones or pits of fruit on the tablecloth. Put them on the side of your plate.

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